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The de Grey Mausoleum in 1821

Entrance to the de Grey Mausoleum on the north side of the chancel August 2011
Entrance to the de Grey Mausoleum on the north side of the chancel August 2011

The following article by J. D. Parry [CRT130Flitton7] on the De Grey Mausoleum appeared in The Gentleman's Magazine for 1821 as part of a larger article on the church.

In the same part of the Church are interred three of the Grey family. Of the Monumental Chapels, one is collateral with the Chancel, and separated by an iron gate, under an arch: this was erected upwards of 200 years ago, but has been since modernized. Four others are of Grecian architecture, with semicircular arches and pilasters, and were erected (as it appears from an inscription in the centre one), and the chancel altered, by Henry, Duke of Kent, A. D. 1701 [sic]. The windows are in that non-descript style sometimes called Modern Gothic.

Detail on the tomb of Lady Jane Hart August 2011
Detail on the tomb of Lady Jane Hart August 2011

In the first Chapel are four monuments: the first, that of the Lady Jane Hart, daughter of John Evelyn, esq. of Godstone, Surrey, wife and relict of Sir Eustace Hart, and formerly of Sir Anthony Ben. This monument was erected by her daughter Annabella, Countess Dowager of Kent. She died in 1671, aged 83 – Her character is portrayed in a long eulogium, which in the quaint style of the times, affirms that she will rise "one of the most glorious pieces of the resurrection". Beneath is a female figure of white marble, in an attitude of grief.

Crest on the tomb of Lady Elizabeth Talbot August 2011
Crest on the tomb of Lady Elizabeth Talbot August 2011

The next is that of Lady Elizabeth Talbot, Countess Dowager of Kent, second daughter and co-heiress of Gilbert, Earl of Shrewsbury; she died at: "hir house at Whitefriars", Dec. 7th, 1651. The third is that of Henry, Earl of Kent, Lord Hastings, Weisford and Ruthin, Lord Lieutenant of Bedford; the founder of this Chapel, who died Jan. 31, 1614 [1615], his wife, daughter of Sir Robert Cotton, of Combermere, in the county of Chester, and relict of Robert, Earl of Derby, who died Nov. 16, 1680, and was buried at Great Gaddesden in Hertfordshire. On this are two fine old recumbent figures in red marble, with robes, ruffs and coronets, their hands joined in an attitude of prayer. Above are the family arms, with the motto, "Foy est tout".

Crest on the memorial on the 5th Earl of Kent August 2011
Crest on the memorial on the 5th Earl of Kent August 2011

The last has also two recumbent figures, in white marble, with full robes and coronets, and four smaller ones at the corner of the tablet above. The first represents Justice with her balance; the second, with a serpent in her hand, and her eyes uplifted, is Immortal Wisdom; the third, leaning on a broken Corinthian column, is Patience, or Fortitude; the fourth, with a broken vessel, and in a distressed attitude, is Charity. – This monument commemorates Henry, Earl of Kent, &c., &c. who died in 1651, and Annabella his wife, by whom it was erected.

Memorial to the 6th Earl of Kent August 2011
Memorial to the 6th Earl of Kent August 2011

On the floor of this Chapel are the tombs of Henry Grey, Earl of Kent, who died in 1729, and Charles, his brother, also Earl of Kent, who died 1723; and an ancient tomb, with the effigies in brass of a man in armour, having a sheathed sword in his left hand, but the inscription is obliterated. Behind one of the pillars of Lady Elizabeth Talbot's monument is an old two-edged sword, and a rusty iron gauntlet.

Memorial to Lady Amabell de Grey August 2011
Memorial to Lady Amabell de Grey August 2011

In the central Chapel are the monuments of the Lady Amabell de Grey , eldest daughter of Henry, Duke of Kent, who married Lord John Glenorchy, eldest son of the Earl of Breadalbane, and died July 20, 1718, leaving one son, and one daughter, afterwards Marchioness Grey: and also that of Anne de Grey, her sister, who married Lord Charles Cavendish, and died Sept. 20, 1733. Both are executed in black, white and grey marble, and ornamented nearly in a similar manner.

Effigy of Anthony de Grey Earl of Harrold August 2011
Effigy of Anthony de Grey Earl of Harrold August 2011

In the North Chapel are three monuments. The first has a noble sarcophagus of black marble, resting on claws, on which reclines the effigies, in a Roman dress, of Anthony de Grey, commonly called Earl of Harrold, created Baron Lucas of Crudwell, who married Lady Mary Tufton, daughter of the Earl of Thanet, and died 1723. The next is that of Henrietta de Grey, third daughter of Henry, Duke of Kent, who died Jan. 4, 1716-17, aged 14. On this is sculptured a youthful form, with a pleasing and innocent countenance, looking up to Heaven, in her hand is a book, resting on a cushion: above is a pyramid, crowned with an urn, and encircled with a wreath of flowers. The third is dedicated to the memory of Henry de Grey, son of the Duke of Kent, who died Dec. 4, 1717, in the 21st year of his age. His effigy is in a loose dress. Above is a pyramid similar to the last, with a wreath of flowers most minutely and beautifully sculptured. In the same Chapel is a neat urn of white marble, on a pedestal; of Purbeck stone, to the memory of the Lady Gregory, daughter to the same Duke of Kent.

Close up on the memorial to Philip Earl of Hardwicke August 2011
Close up on the memorial to Philip Earl of Hardwicke August 2011

The South Chapel has only one monument, that of Philip, Earl of Hardwicke, who died May 16, 1790, erected by his wife Jemima, Marchioness of Grey and Baroness Lucas, who died Jan. 11th, 1797. On this is a beautiful figure in white marble, leaning against an urn. In her countenance deep grief is inimitably depicted, nor can the exquisite flowings of her drapery fail to command the delighted attention of every beholder.

Effigy of the Duke of Kent August 2011
Effigy of the Duke of Kent August 2011

In the last Chapel, to the East, is one large monument of white and veined marble. In the centre is a sarcophagus of dark marble, nearly similar to the former. On this is the recumbent effigies of Henry de Grey, Duke of Kent, in his full robes, with his peer's cap in his hand. By Queen Anne he was created Marquis and Duke of Kent, Lord Chamberlain, Knight of the Garter, and Lord Lieutenant of Bedford and Hereford. He was one of the regents named by George I; afterwards appointed Lord Privy Seal, and to a variety of other offices. By George II he was created Marquis Grey. He erected a magnificent town house, and laid out the gardens of Wrest. His character is recorded in terms of high eulogium. On the right is the effigy of his first wife, Jemima, daughter and co-heiress of Lord Crewe, who died July 27, 1728.

Memorial to the Duke of Kent August 2011
Memorial to the Duke of Kent August 2011

On the left is a tablet commemorating his second wife, Sophia, daughter of William, Lord Portland, who died June 14, 1748: and underneath that of her daughter, Anne-Sophia, who married the Rev. John Egerton, successively Bishop of Bangor, Lichfield and Coventry, and Durham, and died Nov. 21st, 1748.