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Notes on Some of the Other Players in the Round Green Murder

The following brief details of some of the other players in the death of William Bradberry and the trial of William Worsley and are taken from census returns.

The Witnesses and Others

  • George Balls: at the Royal Oak with Worsley, Welch and Day: the 1871 census describes him as 57 years old and a labourer, who had been born at Bendish [Hertfordshire]. He lived with his wife, Susan, and family at 59 Hitchin Road.

 

  • Charles Sidney Beecroft: draper: the 1871 census shows that he and his family lived at 1 George Street West, his shop being in George Street. He was then 52 and had been born in Hertford. Living with him were: his wife Emily, 47, from Middlesex and his children, all born in Luton: Emily S., aged 21; Eliza M., aged 17; Harry, aged 14 and Ellen G., aged 11. There were also two servants - Sarah Gurney, aged 20, from Stanbridge and page William Rumbles, aged 17, from Luton. The Post Office Directory for Bedfordshire of 1869 describes him as: "linen and woollen draper, silk mercer, milliner, hosier, haberdasher and glover, shawl, mantle and carpet warehouseman, tailor, clothier, hatter and funeral furnisher".

 

  • Edward Robert Beecroft: draper's son: the 1871 census shows him living at 51-59 Buckingham Palace Road in London. He was then 19 and a draper's assistant, he had been born in Luton. Also at that address are a lot of other draper's assistants from all over the country

 

  • James Benson: a surgeon: the 1871 census shows he was born in Roscommon in Ireland, and was 29 year old, a general medical practitioner. He was lodging in George Street West with Eliza Butlin, a 70 year old widow and farmer, her two nieces and two servants. The 1869 Post Office Directory notes a Patrick Benson at Wellington Street, who turns out to be also from Roscommon. The 1871 census describes him as a 66 year old surgeon, not practising. Perhaps he was James' father or uncle.

 The former Royal Oak Round Green June 2010
The former Royal Oak Round Green June 2010

  • William Breed: John Gazeley's son-in-law: he lived next door to Gazeley's Royal Oak public house. At the time of the 1871 census he was aged 30, and a groom, he had been born at King's Walden [Hertfordshire]. His wife was 27 year old Margaret, a hat sewer and their children were: Wilfrid, aged 7; Walter, aged 5; Ellen aged 2 and Arthur aged 5 months.

The former King Harry from Hitchin Road June 2010
The former King Harry from Hitchin Road June 2010

  • James Burgess: at the King Harry with William Bradberry: there are a number of men of this name in Luton in the 1871 census and the most likely seems to be a man living at 5 High Town Road. He was aged 29 and a labourer, who had been born in Luton. He had a wife named Mary Ann, she was a sewer and aged 27and came from Wheathampstead [Hertfordshire]. They had a five year old daughter named Lizzie who had been born in Luton and was a scholar.  

 The Old English Gentleman June 2010
The Old English Gentleman June 2010

  • John Conder: surveyor's clerk: he lived next to the Old English Gentleman in Burr Street according to the 1871 census. The census stated that he was 28 years old and a surveyor, having been born in Luton. He was living with his parents: Thomas, a 57 year old grocer from Graveley [Hertfordshire] and Dorcas, who was 55 and from Cottered [Hertfordshire].

 

  • John Gazely or Gazeley: landlord of the Royal Oak: at the time of the 1871 census he was still a licensed victualler and aged 58, having been born in Luton. His wife Mary Ann, aged 57, was living with him and was a bonnet sewer; she had been born in Stopsley. Their son Albert, aged 21, was living with them with his 21 year old wife, Margaret. He was a blocker, she was a sewer. Two grandsons made up the family - Fredric, a 15 year old farm servant and a one year old also called Fredric. Levi Welch had married the Gazeleys' daughter Ada Ann.

 

  • Richard Howe: at the King Harry with William Bradberry: the "elderly labouring man, and deaf" who had so annoyed the judge by refusing to kiss the book is almost certainly a man named Richard How on the 1871 census. This man lived at Stopsley, he was 59 and a pauper, and had been born in Caddington. He lived with his 58 year old wife, Eliza, a hat sewer and their daughters Sarah, aged 20 and Elizabeth, aged 18, both bonnet sewers. George Reed, who also appeared as a witness, and who had been in the Royal Oak with How(e) that night was living with him as a lodger. He was 29 and also a hat sewer, as was his wife, 29 year old Mary Ann.

 

  • William Hucklesby: passer-by: there are two men in the 1871 census with this name, one living in Back Street, the other in New Houses, Stopsley. The latter seems the more likely, given his address. He was 43 and an agricultural labourer, who had been born in Stopsley. He was living with his mother Emma Ansell, aged 73 and her husband William, a 68 year old agricultural labourer.

 

  • Henry Humphreys: gamekeeper: he lived, like William Bradberry, at Lilley. The 1871 census lists him as Henry Humphrey, a 45 year old gamekeeper from Toddington. He lived with his wife, Mary, aged 44, a straw plaiter who had been born at Offley [Hertfordshire] and their 12 year old daughter Mary Ann. Also living at the address were Henry sister-in-law Esther Coleridge, aged 28 and a spinster straw plaiter and Esther's 7 year old daughter, Martha

 

  • Daniel Kilby: saw Worsley, Welch and Day in the street: the 1871 census lists him as a 22 year old blocker, living at 9 Dudley Street. He lived with his parents, George, a 52 year old blocker from Offley and Fanny, a 52 year old sewer from Luton. Daniel's siblings were also living at the house: Henry, a 20 year old blocker; Mary Ann, a 17 year old sewer; Lauria [sic?] a 16 year old sewer; Samuel and 13 and Arthur aged 8, both scholars.

 

  • John Lawrence: at the Royal Oak with Worsley, Welch and Day: a number of men of this name are recorded in and around Luton by the 1871 census. The most likely seems to be a man living in Stopsley, a 42 year old agricultural labourer. He was living with his wife Margaret, a 42 year old hat sewer, their children William, 21 and Edward, 19, both agricultural labourers and a boarder Alice Hill, aged 11 months.

 The former Bell Hotel June 2010
The former Bell Hotel June 2010

  • Abraham Milemore: at the Bell with William Bradberry: only one Abraham Milemore seems to occur on national censuses from 1841-1901, a man in Luton in 1851. He was then 36 and an agricultural labourer living with his 35 year old wife Ann and 3 year old daughter Ann. Strangely the gaol database records three men named Abraham Milemore being imprisoned in Bedford Gaol at various points. The first was in 1840, when 22 year old Abraham Milemore, from Luton, was committed for stealing a pail [QGV10/2]. He was 5 feet 9 inches tall, with brown hair and grey eyes. He served three months hard labour. His birth date would be within three years of the man in the census. The second Milemore was committed in March 1859 for neglect of his family [QGV12/1]. He served one month's hard labour and had no previous convictions; he was thirty six. The final man was committed in May 1868 for non-payment of Poor Rate [QGV12/1]. He was 50, giving him a birth date roughly the same as the Abraham Milemore committed in 1840, but his record clearly states that he had no previous convictions. He served seven days in the gaol. It seems likely that one of these men is the Abraham Milemore who drank at the Bell with William Bradberry.

 

  • George Peters: passer-by: he may be the man listed in the 1871 census who was living in Stopsley with his wife and four sons. He was aged 38 and was a labourer, from Preston [Hertfordshire]. His wife was Ann, a 34 year old straw plaiter and their sons were: Arthur, aged 10; Edward, aged 6; George aged 3 and Charles aged 3 months.

 

  • James Revells: gamekeeper: he is probably the James Revels recorded by the 1871 census as living at Codicote [Hertfordshire]. This man was aged 39 and a gamekeeper, having been born in Bennington [Hertfordshire]. His wife was 39 year old Emma from Wymondley [Hertfordshire] and their children: Benjamin, aged 21, a labourer; James, aged 11; Elizabeth aged 9; Sarah aged 7 and George aged 5.

 

  • Benjamin Scrivener: at the Royal Oak with Worsley, Welch and Day: the 1871 census placed this man in Stopsley with his wife, son and daughter. He was aged 38 and an agricultural labourer from Leagrave. His wife, Maria, was aged 36 and from Barton-le-Clay, she was a hat sewer. Their son Walter was 13, a house boy, and their daughter Lizzie 11, a hat sewer.

 

  • Kitt Tomson: the surgeon: the 1871 census has Kitt Tomson living at 1 Langley Street; he was then 48 and a general practitioner who had been born in Sundon. He was living with his wife, Ann M., aged 44, from Luton. They had two children: 9 year old Walter and 13 days old Alice M. C. Mary Bolton, aged 21 was visiting them. Their two servants were: Hannah Richards, aged 19, who was born on the Northampton local line at Wellingborough [Northamptonshire], presumably in a carriage, and Alice Tole, a 52 year old nurse from Wilshamstead.

 

The Law

 

  • Charles Addington Austin: prosecuting solicitor: the Post Office Directory of 1869 describes him thus: "solicitor, commissioner in chancery and all law courts, registrar of county court, clerk to county magistrates and clerk to Luton road trustees". His offices were in George Street. The 1871 census reveals that he lived in 74 George Street and was 48 years old; he had been born in Luton. He lived with his wife Dora, aged 45, and from the Somerset portion of Bristol. They had one child, an eight year old daughter called Agnes Dora. They also had two servants: Sarah Bates was a 30 year old cook from Winslow [Buckinghamshire] and Mary J. Wimbush was an 18 year old housemaid from Oxfordshire.

 

  • George Bailey: William Worsley's solicitor: the Post Office Directory of 1869 describes him as: "solicitor, perpetual commissioner for taking acknowledgements of deeds by married women and commissioner in all law courts and clerk to the Luton Board of Health". His offices were in Union Street. In the 1871 census he is listed as living at Union Street; he was 47 years old and had been born in Luton. His wife was Mary, aged 45, from Fenny Stratford [Buckinghamshire]. Mary P. Gormly [?], an aunt of either Bailey of his wife was also living with them. She was from Dunstable and was "previously manager to manufacturer". Phoebe Wilson, an unmarried sister of Mary, aged 31 and from Haddenham [Buckinghamshire] was also living at the address as a general servant.

 

  • Baron Bramwell: the judge was, in fact, George William Wilshere (1808-1892) who was created a Baron of the Exchequer in 1856 and was raised to the peerage as Baron Bramwell of Hever in 1881. the 1871 census found him at home at Wormwood Place, Penshurst [Kent]. His wife was Martha, aged 36 and they had three servants: Elizabeth Leney, 36, from Westerham [Kent]; Mary Winters, 24, from Kent and Sarah Worsell, 23, from Lingfield [Surrey].

 

  • William Calcraft: the executioner: Calcraft (1800-1879) became an executioner in 1829 and continued to practice the art until retirement in 1874. He performed the last public hanging in the country, at Newgate on 26th May 1868, just 58 days after William Worsley hanged in Bedford. Coincidentally, the 1871 census found Calcraft again in Bedford where he was lodged at the CountyGaol, waiting to hang William Bull on 3rd April. He was then 70 and his profession was given simply as "public executioner". He had been born in Little Baddow [Essex].

 

  • J. Elliott of Sundon: juror: this man is probably James Elliott who, in the 1871 census, is recorded as a farmer of 299½ acres, employing 13 men and 5 boys. He had been born at Stowe [Buckinghamshire] and was 46 years old. He lived at Upper Sundon with his 43 year old wife Elizabeth, originally from Aylesbury [Buckinghamshire] their three children William Henry, aged 18, Elizabeth Ann, aged 9 and John aged 3) and Elliott's mother-in-law Ann Kirby, aged 66, from Ambrosden in Oxfordshire.

 

  • J. Hallworth of Heath and Reach: juror: this man is probably John Hallworth of Grange Mill at Nares Gladley. The 1871 census describes him as a farmer and miller, aged 35, originally from Greenfield. His wife was 39 year old Eliza from Bow Brickhill [Buckinghamshire] and they had four children: Robert, aged 10; Eliza, aged 8; Charles, aged 6 and William, aged 2. William was the only child born in Heath and Reach, the others having been born in Ampthill.

 

  • J. Horsford of Dean: juror: this man is probably James Alfred Horsford of Upper Dean. The 1871 census states that he was then 35 years of age, a farmer of 196 acres employing 4 labourers and 3 boys. He came from Stow [Huntingdonshire] and was married to 28 year old Emily, originally from Spaldwick [Huntingdonshire]. They had six children: John L. aged 8, born in Stow; Annie, aged 10, born in Stow; Benjamin, aged 6, born in Dean; William, aged 4, born in Dean; Charles, aged 2, born in Dean and James A., aged 8 months, also born in Dean. One servant lived with them, Elizabeth Dawson, aged 13, born in Dean.

 

  • J. J. Joyce of Renhold: juror: John J. Joyce is described by the 1871 census as farmer of 140 acres employing 3 men and 2 boys. He lived at Manor Farm, was 34 years old and had been born in the village. He was married to 39 year old Sarah, from Ravensden and they had three children: John, aged 5; James Henry, aged and Annie A., aged 1. A servant, Sally Bull, aged 24, from Ravensden, was also living at Manor Farm.

 

  • Rev. Maclear: Chaplain at Bedford Prison: The Post Office Directory of 1869 informs us that this was Rev. George Maclear, M. A., who lived at 5 The Crescent, conveniently close to the prison. The 1861 census puts him at 4 The Crescent. He was then 62 and was listed as Chaplain of the CountyGaol. He had been born in Ireland and lived with his 63 year old wife Catherine who came from Stamford [Lincolnshire]. Their daughter Isabel, 25, lived with them, she had been born in Bedford. The family had three servants: Sarah Petch, aged 47, a widow from Isleham [Cambridgeshire]; Ruth Petch, aged 16 and from the same place and Eliza Shadbolt, aged 31, from Bedford. The 1851 census puts the family at 3 The Crescent and shows that the couple had a son named George Frederick, then 18, who had been born in Bedford. The 1881 census puts this man, then aged 48 in Canterbury [Kent] where he ran CanterburyMissionaryCollege.

 

  • Isaac Marriner: Luton Police Constable: this man is probably the Isaac Marriner appearing in the 1871 census as a police sergeant in Biggleswade, he probably transferred with George Smith. In 1871 he was 33. He had been born at Great Staughton [Huntingdonshire]. He lived with his 30 year old wife Louisa, who had been born in Luton, and they had three children: Emily Jane, aged 7; Minnie K., aged 5 and Walter R., aged 2. All the children had been born in Luton.

 

  • J. Pell of Wilden: juror: this man is probably the John Pell shown in the 1871 census as being a 56 year old James Pell a farmer who had been born in Wilden. He lived at Church farm with his 49 year old wife Elizabeth, from Clapham, and their six children, all of whom had been born in Wilden: Charles, aged 17; Thomas, aged 14; Joseph, aged 12; Elizabeth, aged 10; Catherine, aged 8 and George, aged 5.

 

  • Samuel Pope: Superintendent of Police at Luton: the 1871 census states that he was still Superintendent of Police, living at the Police Station next to the Oddfellows Arms in Dunstable Place, between Upper George Street and Stuart Street. He was a 55 year old widower who had been born in Ickwell. His widowed mother, Elizabeth, aged 86, also lived at the station. She was originally from Eynesbury [Huntingdonshire] and her husband had been a gardener. A servant, 32 year old Hannah E. Hitchcock, from Hertfordshire, lived with them.

 

  • Robert Evan Roberts: Governor of Bedford Gaol (1853-1885): the 1861 census states that he was then 43 years of age and had been born in Woolwich [Kent]. The Governor's House was attached to the prison and the address was given as 1 Saint Loyes Street. His wife was 49 year old Mary Ann, who came from Welshpool [Montgomeryshire]. The couple had a son, Robert George, aged 7, who had been born in Bedford. Also living with them were two servants - Eliza Birch, aged 20, from Olney [Buckinghamshire] and Ann Rumbelow, aged 16, from Norfolk.  

 

  • George Smith: Inspector of Police at Luton: the 1861 census shows that he was then aged 30 and a police sergeant. He had been born in Clapham and lived at 22 Princess Street with a 22 year old Thomas Smith, probably his brother, although the census does not give his relationship to George. He had also been born in Clapham and was a labourer.

 

  • F. Swannell of Felmersham: juror: Frederick Swannell was shown on the 1871 census as living at 5 Bedford Road, Radwell, he was a farmer and had been born in Felmersham. His wife, Dinah, was aged 39 and came from Binfield in Berkshire. They had four children: Louisa M., aged 14, who had been born in Hinwick; Edward aged 4, who had been born in Radwell; Elizabeth, aged 2, from Radwell and Annie aged 7 months, who had also been born in Radwell.

 

  • T. Swannell of Bromham: juror: Thomas Swannell is shown in the 1869 Post Office Directory as a farmer at Swan Green in Bromham.