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The Coach and Horses Public House Woburn

On the green space were, receding from the camera, Swan, White Horse Windmill and Coach and Horses
On the green space were, receding from the camera, Swan, White Horse, Windmill and Coach and Horses

Coach and Horses Public House: Leighton Street, Woburn

This public house was in existence by 1734 when Mary Elphick (nee Lamb) enfranchised it from being a copyhold property [R6/63/31/2]. From 1736 it was mentioned in the register of dues owed to the Vicar of Woburn for premises in the parish. In 1744 it was part owned by Mary Elphick (now Mary Spinage) and her sister Rebecca Lamb. Rebecca sold her half to the Duke of Bedford in that year [R6/63/31/1-2], with Mary selling her half to the Duke when her son Lamb Elphick  became 21 in 1749 [R6/63/31/5-6].

The Coach and Horses stood in Leighton Street overlooking the Market House. The house next door, on the corner of Leighton Street and George Street was also owned by the sisters and sold to the Duke at the same time. The public house closed in 1811 and was subsequently demolished, probably to widen the road.

The junction of Leighton Street and George Street about 1900 [Z50/135/34]
The junction of Leighton Street and George Street about 1900 [Z50/135/34]

List of Sources Held at Bedfordshire & Luton Archives & Records Service:

  • P118/3/1: parochial dues: 1709-1796 [1736-1796];
  • R6/63/31/1-2: sale of half the property: 1744;
  • R6/63/31/3: agreement for sale of half the property: 1744;
  • R6/63/31/6: sale of half of the property: 1749;
  • P118/28/2: parochial assessment book: 1802-1833;
  • R1/78: Thomas Evans' map accompanying R2/69: 1821
  • R2/69: Detailed survey of Woburn made by Thomas Evans for the Duke of Bedford: 1822

List of Licensees: note that this is not a complete list. Italics indicate licensees whose beginning and/or end dates are not known:

1736-1744: Thomas Burbidge;
1748-1749: Elizabeth Burbidge, widow;
1761: Burbidge;
1785-1811: Edward Handscomb;
1811: public house closed