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13 and 14 Ickwell Green

13 and 14 Ickwell Green April 2009
13 and 14 Ickwell Green April 2009

13 and 14 Ickwell Green were listed by the former Department of Environment in October 1966 as Grade II, of special interest. The department dated the properties to the 17th century; they were reworked in the 19th century. They are have a timber framed construction, later encased with colour washed brick and have a clay tile roof, one storey and attics. A 20th century addition lies to the rear.

The cottages may have been built by the Lord of the Manor of Ickwell, or may have been subsequently acquired by the manorial estate. This estate, The Ickwell Bury Estate, was sold at auction in 1924. The particulars read as follows, the same lot including three pairs of which 13 and 14 were one:

LOT 26

Three Pairs of semi-detached Cottages
with Gardens situate on Ickwell Green
The Cottages are Brick Built and Tiledand Let to R. BRUNT, R. WILLIAMS, Mrs. C. NORMAN, J. CLARKE, J. GARNER and W. WAGSTAFF on Yearly, October 11th, Tenancies.

Garner and Wagstaff occupied 13 and 14 Ickwell Green.

The Rating and Valuation Act 1925 specified that every building and piece of land in the country was to be assessed to determine its rateable value. Ickwell was assessed in 1927 and the valuer visiting 13 and 14 Ickwell Green [DV1/C44/101-102] found them to be owned by The Onyx Property Investment Company Limited. The valuer noted that Onyx had bought 2 Warden Road, 12, 13 and 14 Ickwell Green in the 1924 auction for £450.

Number 13 was occupied by William Wagstaff who had paid £5 per annum rent since 1909. Accommodation comprised a living room, kitchen and pantry with two bedrooms above. A coal house and earth closet stood outside.

Number 14 was occupied by John Garner and no rent is noted in the valuer’s notebook. Accommodation comprised a living room, kitchen, scullery and pantry with two bedrooms above. The valuer noted that Garner himself had added the wood and corrugated iron lean-to scullery. Outside lay a coal house and an earth closet. Both cottages had a small garden and water was obtained from an outside tap.