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Clapham Church Architecture

The church from the south-east April 2010
The church from the south-east April 2010

The most impressive thing about the church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury is its tower, which seems out of all proportion to the rest of the church. It was built of rubble-stone either just before or just after the Norman Conquest. The belfry openings at the top, and perhaps the whole of the top storey, are adjudged late 11th century but may be later than the rest of the tower which many have described as Anglo-Saxon.

The north side of the west tower April 2010
The north side of the west tower April 2010

The chancel arch is Norman and the chancel was originally longer than the nave. The arch was taken down and rebuilt when the chancel was rebuilt between 1861 and 1863.

The south porch April 2010
The south porch April 2010

The north and south aisles date to the late 13th century, though only the first two bays of the arcades are original Early English work. The third bay was added by George Gilbert Scott when the church was restored